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MV Plancius


M/v "Plancius" was built in 1976 as an oceanographic research vessel for the Royal Dutch Navy and was named "Hr. Ms. Tydeman". The ship sailed for the Dutch Navy until June 2004 and was eventually purchased by Oceanwide Expeditions.

The vessel was completely rebuilt as a 114-passenger vessel in 2009 and complies with the latest SOLAS-regulations (Safety Of Life At Sea). M/v "Plancius" is classed by Lloyd's Register in London and flies the Dutch flag. 

M/v "Plancius" accommodates 114 passengers in 53 passenger cabins with private toilet and shower in 5 quadruple private cabins, 38 twin private cabins (ca. 15 square meters) and 10 twin superior cabins (ca. 21 square meters).
 

   Click here to download ship factsheet                                                                                                                                                                             
     

MV Ortelius

The ice-strengthened vessel Ortelius is an excellent vessel for Polar expedition cruises in the Arctic and Antarctica, opening up the opportunity to adventure in remote locations such as the Ross Sea and Franz Josef Land

Built in Poland in 1989 for the Russian Academy of Science, prior to its renaming.  This vessel has the highest ice-class notation and is therefore very suitable to navigate in solid one-year sea ice and loose multi-year pack ice. 

M/V Ortelius accommodated 100 passengers and has lots of open-deck spaces and a very large bridge which is accessible to passengers, and offers simple but comfortable cabins and public spaces, two restaurants, a sauna, and bar/lecture space.
 
 
     
 
 
 

S/V Noorderlicht

The 'Noorderlicht' provides accommodation for 20 travellers in comfortable twin cabins. All cabins have upper and lower berths, a cupboard and wash basin with hot and cold water. Shared shower (4) and toilet (5) facilities are conveniently located. All cabins have a small hatch in the ceiling which vary in size, except cabin 6 which has a small, locked porthole in the ceiling but ventilation slots in the door. 
The 'Noorderlicht' has a well-balanced two-masted schooner rig and is well suited for expedition cruising among small islands and offer good open deck viewing areas, also when under sail. The 2 inflatable rubber crafts (zodiacs) enable landing and wildlife viewing opportunities. The qualified captains have a great experience and together with the rest of the crew, they will do everything possible to ensure that you have a wonderful and unforgettable journey.

 
 
     
 
 

S/V Rembrandt van Rijn

The Rembrandt van Rijn measures 56 meters in length (168 ft.), 7 meters in width and has a draft of 2,5 meters. The maximum speed on engines is 9 knots. It has an experienced crew of 12 persons on board including 2 tour guides. The ship can accommodate a maximum of 33 passengers in 16 twin cabins in 1 Triple Private cabin (with shower and toilet and porthole), 6 Twin Private Inside cabins (with shower and toilet, no porthole), 9 Twin Private cabins (with shower and toilet and porthole). 
The ship is well suited for expedition cruising among small islands and offer good open deck viewing areas, also when under sail. The 2 inflatable rubber crafts (zodiacs) enable landing and wildlife viewing opportunities in otherwise inaccessible areas

 
 
     

Onboard information: Age Range & Nationality - Passengers on a typical voyage range from their 30s to their 80s - with a majority usually from 45 - 65. Our expeditions attract independent-minded travellers from around the world. They are characterised by a strong interest in exploring remote regions. The camaraderie and spirit that develops aboard is an important part of the expedition experience. Many departures have several nationalities on board.
  Combating sea sickness - Anticipate some rough water on the voyage. Should you be prone to motion or sea sickness, please consult your physician which medication is appropriate and its side effects.  To avert motion sickness, avoid alcohol, tobacco, excess liquids, and confined spaces. Most people feel better sitting on deck looking at the horizon or prone with eyes shut. Oddly, you will feel better with some food, such as crackers or dry toast in your stomach. Many people eat to avoid feeling sick. Remember, once you start to experience motion sickness, medications are of little help.
  Dress code - In keeping with our expeditions atmosphere, dress on board is informal. Bring casual and comfortable clothing for all activities. Keep in mind that much of the spectacular scenery can be appreciated from deck, which can be slippery. Bring sturdy shoes with no-slip soles and make sure the parka is never far away in case of the call "Whales!" comes over the loudspeaker and you have to dash outside. Wear layers since it is comfortably warm aboard the ship - and often cold on deck.
  Gratuities - The customary gratuity to the ship's service personnel is made as a blanket contribution at the end of the voyage which is divided among the crew. You will receive detailed guidelines aboard. Tipping is a very personal matter and the amount you wish to give is at your discretion. As a generally accepted guideline, we suggest US$8 to US$10 per person per day. It is better for the crew, if we can give them cash US Dollar.
  Non-smoking policy - On board our vessels we have a non-smoking policy. It is prohibited to smoke inside the ship. You can smoke on deck but do not throw your cigarette filter overboard ! Do not smoke on the aft deck in the proximity of zodiacs, engines and fuel. Please respect the wishes of non-smokers.
 

 

Your physical condition - You must be in good general health and you should be able to walk several hours per day. The expedition is ship-based and physically not very demanding. Although we spend as much time as possible ashore, you are welcome to remain aboard the ship if you like. To join most excursions, you must be able to get up and down the steep gangway from the ship to the water level to board the Zodiacs. Staff will assist you in and out of the boats. This will become progressively easier with practice. Ashore it can be slippery and rocky. You are travelling in remote areas without access to sophisticated medical facilities, so you must not join this expedition if you have a life-threatening condition, or need daily medical treatment.

   


 

 

 

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